Textiles

This exhibit explores the textiles in Foxfire’s collections, such as coverlets and quilts, the processes to create these, and their impact on Appalachian lifeways.

Introduction

Introduction

The Foxfire Textiles: Within the Foxfire collections are over forty unique textile artifacts. The bulk of these are either quilts or handwoven coverlets. Nearly every artifact was donated by a...
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Patchwork Quilt

Patchwork Quilt

History: A classic example of patchwork quilting, this textile is essentially utilitarian. Made from recycled clothing, the inconsistent block sizes and shapes and lack of pattern indicates that...
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Crazy Quilt

Crazy Quilt

“Quilting was the joy of my life. Working with that.  Ever’ little piece.” ~Aunt Arie Carpenter History: Crazy quilts were originally a method for using scraps of cloth, much like...
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Fishtail Quilt

Fishtail Quilt

History This quilt was donated to Foxfire by Aunt Arie Carpenter, which she called a “fishtail.” She made it around the time of World War I, when she was a young woman caring for her...
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Log Cabin Quilt

Log Cabin Quilt

History: Log cabin, one of the most well-known quilt patterns, became popular around the beginning of the Civil War and have since retained their popularity. Shortly before the Civil War, the log...
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Friendship Quilt

Friendship Quilt

“Quilts were hand made by people for people. Every phase of their production was permeated by giving and sharing.” ~Mrs. Claude Darnell History: Friendship quilts were common in most communities and...
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Star Quilt

Star Quilt

“…when a girl got married, she always had to have twelve quilts to start off with…the lady usually made some of the quilts herself.  And then the community usually got together and...
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Sunflower Summer Quilt

Sunflower Summer Quilt

History: Cloth sacks were used by manufacturers beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, but became common around the 1920s. Goods such as chicken and hog feed, sugar, flour, and guano fertilizer...
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